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Home | Seminars and Symposia | Past seminars/symposia: Wednesday, April 21, 2004

DTC Seminar Series

Illumination Under Trees

by

Nelson Max
Applied Science and Computer Science
University of California, Davis

Wednesday, April 21, 2004
1:00 pm

402 Walter Library

Nelson Max

Download slides (pdf 1.7 MB) Dr. Nelson Max will discuss software and hardware versions of hierarchical image-based rendering of trees, done by reprojecting raster images of tree parts for new orientations, lighting conditions, and viewpoints. He will also discuss three algorithms for illumination under trees, one for shadow penumbras, one for light beams visible in the mist below the trees, and one for plane-parallel radiance transport, which is an approximation to radiosity. All topics will be illustrated by video animation.

Nelson Max

 

Professor Max has a PhD in mathematics from Harvard University. His current research interests are in the areas of scientific visualization, volume and flow rendering, computer animation, molecular graphics, and realistic computer rendering, including shadow and radiosity effects. Since 1977, he has been a Computer Scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and has been teaching part time at the University of California, Davis, currently as a Professor in the departments of Applied Science and Computer Science. Dr. Max has taught mathematics and computer science at UC Berkeley, the University of Georgia, Carnegie Mellon University, and Case Western Reserve University. He was director of the NSF supported Topology Films Project in the early 1970s, which produced computer animated educational films on mathematics. He has worked in Japan for three and one-half years as co-director of two Omnimax (hemisphere screen) stereo films for international expositions, showing the molecular basis of life. For the past ten years, he has concentrated on volume, vector field, and flow visualization for 3D simulations, and on image-based rendering.