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Home | Seminars and Symposia | Past seminars/symposia: Monday, April 14, 2003

DTC Seminar Series

Multiagent Coordinator and Focal Points

by

Dr. Jeff Rosenschein
Hebrew University — Jerusalem, Israel
Computer Science and Engineering

Monday, April 14, 2003
1:30 pm

402 Walter Library

In Multiagent Systems, coordination among agents serves as the ultimate goal of many systems and theories. Whether agents are benevolent and built to be cooperative or self-interested (and potentially in conflict) the ability to coordinate that is to correlate actions in beneficial ways drives research in the field. In this talk, Dr. Rosenschein considers multiagent coordination as an attempt to achieve cost optimization among multiple agents, using repeated planning to enable joint agent activity in the presence of mutually-held information. This approach to coordination lends itself to focal point analysis, and is also related to issues of re-planning that have been explored when agents attempt to build new plans that are "close" (by some metric) to other plans. The optimal solution of multiagent coordination, independent of the underlying mechanism, may turn out to be a focal point in the domain of action. He illustrates this phenomenon with an example involving repeated planning and recent analysis results from information theory. This is ongoing joint work with Zinovi Rabinovich, Ariel Felner, and Alex Pomeransky (and includes previous work with Eithan Ephrati, Sarit Kraus, and Maier Fenster).

 

Dr. Jeff Rosenschein is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. His research interests revolve around issues of cooperation and competition among agents, and the use of economic theory, voting theory, and game theory to establish appropriate foundations for Distributed Artificial Intelligence. Dr. Rosenschein received his B.A. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University (1979), and at Stanford University he received his M.S. (1982) and Ph.D. (1986) in Computer Science, respectively. Dr. Rosenschein co-authored the book, Rules of Encounter: Designing Conventions for Automated Negotiation among Computer, published by MIT Press in 1994, which explores how automated agents can be designed in ways that allow them to reach cooperative agreements, or cope with inevitable conflicts.