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Home | Seminars and Symposia | Past seminars/symposia: Monday, November 23, 2009

DTC Seminar Series

Large Deviations Of Max-Weight Scheduling Policies

by

Vijay Subramanian
Hamilton Institute
National University of Ireland, Maynooth

Monday, November 23, 2009
3:00 pm

405 Walter Library

We consider a single-server discrete-time system with $K$ users where the server picks operating points from a compact, convex and coordinate convex set in $Re_+^K$. For this system we analyse the performance of a stablising policy that at any given time picks operating points from the allowed rate region that maximise a weighted sum of rate, where the weights depend upon the workloads of the users. In particular, we are interested in a Large Deviations based analysis of this policy, and under both the "large-buffer" and "many-sources" regimes. The unifying theme of this work is to prove a Large Deviations Principle (LDP) for the queueing process using an appropriate generalization of the contraction principle, namely, Puhalskii's extended contraction principle and Garcia's extended contraction principle.

 

Dr. Vijay G. Subramanian received the B.Tech. degree from the Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, in 1993, the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, in 1995, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, in 1999. From 1999 to 2006, he was with the 
Networks Business, Motorola, Arlington Heights, IL where he worked on developing wireless scheduling 
algorithms deployed in many of Motorola's wireless data products. Since May 2006 he is a Research 
Fellow at the Hamilton Institute, NUIM, Ireland. His research interests include information theory, 
communications, communication networks, wireless networks, queueing theory, mathematical immunology and applied probability and stochastic processes.