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Home | Seminars and Symposia | Past seminars/symposia: Monday, November 16, 2009

DTC Seminar Series

Research Activities at the Navigation Systems Division of Northrop Grumman

by

Jeff Dickman and Phil Bruner
Northrop Grumman Corporation

Monday, November 16, 2009
11:30 am–12:30 pm

402 Walter Library

Northrop Grumman is a multinational corporation with 120,000 employees in all 50 states and 25 countries. Their leading capabilities are in system integration, battle management, information technology, defense electronics, shipbuilding, as well as space and missile defense. The navigation systems division (NSD) is located in Woodland Hills, CA and is a subset of the corporation that focuses on high-end inertial navigation systems and other types of integrated navigation technologies. This presentation will talk about the company as well as broadly focused on two selected projects of interest to navigation researchers. The first project centers around the concept of multi-mode position, navigation, and timing whereby existing sensors on a platform can be re-tasked to provide navigation observations. In time of ever-shrinking UAVs and an ever-growing list of sensors, size, weight, and power are severely constrained and it is desirable to take advantage of sensors that are used for other applications. The second project is a system for precise relative positioning as it applies to automated aerial refueling. With a rise in popularity of UAVs, it is desirable to extend their mission longevity and endurance so it is desirable to safely and reliably refuel while in-flight.

 

Jeff Dickman is a Research Scientist with Northrop Grumman Navigation Systems Division. His area of expertise includes navigation systems and sensor stabilization. Dr. Dickman’s has worked with GPS and Inertial sensor integration for high-accuracy single-platform sensor stabilization and is experienced with interferometric differential GPS for position and velocity aiding. Jeff is interested in high-sensitivity GPS processing techniques for challenging GPS conditions. Jeff also has experience in GPS-challenged/denied navigation, landing system development, as well as antenna measurement and pattern shaping techniques for ground-based pseudolites. Phil Bruner is a Member Technical Staff in the Advanced Technology and Strategic Applications Dept. at Northrop Grumman-Navigation Systems Division, where he is involved in the design and test of various multi sensor navigation systems. Since 1991 Mr. Bruner’s primary interest has centered on use of INS/GPS as an element of the military navigation system. Mr. Bruner acts as the division’s principal interface to the GPS community and provides technical and programmatic expertise to the division on matters concerning the GPS system. Prior to joining Litton Guidance and Control in 1978, Mr. Bruner was employed by the McDonnell Aircraft Company as an avionics engineer working on the integration and flight testing of a variety of tactical aircraft.